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Showing posts from October, 2012

Eco-Pioneer Paying It Forward: Rachel Carson’s Legacy

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the publication of Rachel Carson’s seminal book, Silent Spring, which warned of the far-reaching dangers of deadly pesticides and was widely regarded as a catalyst for America’s conservation, clean air and water and environmental protection movements.

Now author Laurie Lawlor and illustrator Laurie Beingessner bring her message to today’s youth in the children’s book, Rachel Carson and Her Book That Changed the World. Carson’s life—from her childhood fascination with nature to becoming a college graduate and biologist to writing Silent Spring before her death in 1964—is told in easy-to-understand terms. An epilogue recounts her legacy for all generations.

Carson encouraged readers to rethink fundamental values about the relationship between people and nature and not to suppose that, “Nature exists for the convenience of man,” as she put it. One of the vivid examples of life’s interconnectedness that Carson cited occurred in Clear Lake, Californ…

Breast Cancer Links to Environmental Toxins

New evidence that chemical pollution may be linked to breast cancer comes from a surprising source: a group of male breast cancer patients at Camp Lejeune, a Marine Corps base in North Carolina. Poisons in the camp’s drinking water, including benzene, a carcinogenic gasoline additive, perchloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), are regarded as a cause; conditions at the base are also blamed for unusual rates of leukemia and birth defects.
The worst period of contamination of the base’s water supply began in the late 1950s and continued for more than 30 more years. Because men are simpler to study than women— their risk of developing breast cancer is not complicated by factors such as menstruation, reproduction, breastfeeding and hormone replacement therapy—the epidemiologists may be able to conclusively link industrial chemicals with an increased risk of the disease for both genders.
Source: National Disease Clusters Alliance

October 24 is Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine Day

The popularity of acupuncture in the United States is increasing steadily, according to a study of Americans’ use of the ancient Chinese energy balancing technique, published in Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine.
Researchers found that in 2007, 6 percent of adult Americans included acupuncture as part of their regular health care regimen, up 42 percent from 2002 (at that time, the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine also reported that 60 percent of adults surveyed considered acupuncture as a treatment option).
Most commonly used for pain relief, acupuncture is based on the theory that needle stimulation of specific points on the body’s energy channels, called meridians, corrects imbalances and helps restore health. Some Western experts believe that the needles stimulate pain-sensing nerves, which trigger the brain to release endorphins, the body’s pain-relieving chemicals.
Former President Richard Nixon is generally credited wit…

ABCs Keep Colon Cancer at Bay

What do Brussels sprouts, broccoli, cabbage and cauliflower have in common? According to a new  study published in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, these cruciferous veggies are associated with a decreased risk of colon cancer. Throw in a good measure of A’s, as in apples, and people can also reduce their risk of distal colon cancer, report researchers from the Western Australian Institute for Medical Research at the University of Western Australia and Deakin University, in Victoria, Australia. The investigation examined the potential link between fruits and vegetables and three cancers in different parts of the bowel.