Breast Cancer Links to Environmental Toxins


New evidence that chemical pollution may be linked to breast cancer comes from a surprising source: a group of male breast cancer patients at Camp Lejeune, a Marine Corps base in North Carolina. Poisons in the camp’s drinking water, including benzene, a carcinogenic gasoline additive, perchloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), are regarded as a cause; conditions at the base are also blamed for unusual rates of leukemia and birth defects.
The worst period of contamination of the base’s water supply began in the late 1950s and continued for more than 30 more years. Because men are simpler to study than women— their risk of developing breast cancer is not complicated by factors such as menstruation, reproduction, breastfeeding and hormone replacement therapy—the epidemiologists may be able to conclusively link industrial chemicals with an increased risk of the disease for both genders.
Source: National Disease Clusters Alliance

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